Disposing Of Materials After A Building Demolition

I have always been someone who is interested in manufacturing, but a few years ago I started working harder on learning about the industry. I started visiting as many factories as I could, and before I knew it, I realized that there were a lot of things that I didn't know how to do yet. I started going to workshops and talking with real industry professionals, and it was really eye opening. This blog is all about learning about the people and processes that make all of our greatest inventions, and what you can do to create a better life for yourself.

Disposing Of Materials After A Building Demolition

Disposing Of Materials After A Building Demolition

23 June 2017
 Categories:
Industrial & Manufacturing, Blog


If your company has a demolition project ahead, you probably have already figured out how to get the right permits and engage the right crew members for the demolition itself. However, you might not have decided how you'll deal with all the materials that will be left on the site. Concrete and wood are two of the most common materials you'll have to remove from the site before it can be used for another purpose, so you'll want to use the information here to dispose of them properly.

Concrete

Concrete can often be the heaviest material on a construction site, and you might think you'll have a hard time disposing of it. Luckily, there are a number of things you can do to get concrete off a worksite easier than you might think. A common place to take extra concrete once you've loaded it onto dumpsters or trucks is to cart it off to a local landfill. However, a landfill is likely to charge you according to the weight of the concrete you're bringing to the site, and that can become expensive, depending on how much you've got.

Concrete salvage and recycling yards can also accept some concrete; the concrete that you're disposing of can be finely ground down for use in new concrete projects. Road construction crews can use recycled concrete, as can home contractors, who might use it as part of the foundations they pour. Just be sure to call salvage and recycling yards to ensure that they have room onsite for the amount of concrete that you'll be bringing over. A single site might not be able to accommodate all the concrete you've got, so you may need to contact a few. Some of these companies will also supply dumpsters for you so that you don't need to spend money on that separately.

Wood

You might already realize that wood can be recycled, so recycling is a natural choice for any lumber left on a site after demolition. There are many companies that can collect lumber from your site. However, you can also sell off the lumber to private owners or other construction companies for their own use. If you choose to do this, be sure that you have a clean, dry place to store the lumber until you've got buyers.

Once you know what you'll do with all the materials on your site, you can take action and clear the site completely so you can move on to another project. Contact companies like Alliance Demolition Services Inc to find out which solution will work for your needs. 

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Choosing Better Manufacturing Practices

I have always been someone who is interested in manufacturing, but a few years ago I started working harder on learning about the industry. I started visiting as many factories as I could, and before I knew it, I realized that there were a lot of things that I didn't know how to do yet. I started going to workshops and talking with real industry professionals, and it was really eye opening. This blog is all about learning about the people and processes that make all of our greatest inventions, and what you can do to create a better life for yourself.

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